Articles by: Giulia Biasibetti

Admissions and Life at the School, BSG Staff

Our Admissions team with tutor for admissions Prof Monica Toft

An update from the Admissions control room

It’s almost a month since the deadline for applications to BSG, so we thought we’d give you an update. It has been a busy month for our Admissions team (pictured here) – the central Graduate Admissions and Funding team has been collating thousands of applications for all the graduate courses at the University of Oxford, and they’ve been sending the complete applications through to us.

by × 19 February 2015 ×

Admissions and Life at the School, BSG Staff

Juan David and Diana on Matriculation Day

Student Life: Interview with Diana and Juan David

Meeting the families of some our students is almost normal business for us at BSG – with an age range from 21 to 41, it often happens that students relocating to Oxford from across the world are followed by their children and partners.
However, there was a lot of excitement when Juan David and Diana arrived last September, because their case is quite unique. They are married, and BOTH are BSG students! Diana is studying for an MPP, while Juan David is one of of our first DPhil students.

by × 13 February 2015 ×

BSG Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

Prof Ngaire Woods moderates a debate at the World Economic Forum 2015

Dispatches from Davos

Davos attracts some unusual groupies. This year the appearance of rapper Will.I.Am and ‘Happy’ Pharrell Williams caused a collective rush of pin-stripe suits urgently determined to get a selfie with a star. Personally, I managed to quench the urge to prove to my teenage children that Davos is cool — and got cool by tramping around in the snow instead.

by × 04 February 2015 ×

BSG Students, Governance, cooperation and law

Dean Ngaire Woods in conversation with Mayor Anibal Gaviria.

The numbers speak for themselves: a conversation with the Mayor of Medellín

The first day of the Challenges of Government Conference featured a conversation with the mayor of the world’s most innovative city, Medellín, Colombia, moderated by the Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government, Professor Ngaire Woods. In line with the theme of this year’s conference “Flourishing Cities”, BSG hosted the […]

by × 05 January 2015 ×

BSG Students, Governance, cooperation and law

Patrick Les Galesat the Challenges of Government Conference 2014

Bringing in the doctors: can academia save government from itself?

Academics and policymakers need to work harder to ensure that the best evidence informs and gets translated into the most effective public policies. That is one of the main underlying conclusions from the “Challenges of Government: Flourishing Cities” conference, organised by the Oxford Blavatnik School of Government and held in Oxford last week.

by × 19 December 2014 ×

BSG Alumni, Governance, cooperation and law

Peshawar school attack: Will it be a turning point in the war against terrorism?

Peshawar school attack: Will it be a turning point in the war against terrorism?

Welcome to Denialistan and Contradictionistan. Yes, all this has happened in the “land of the pure” and there are no signs of it coming to an end in the near future. Will this prove to be the turning point in the war against extremism and terrorism? At least, I am not optimistic. Here are my reasons.

by × 17 December 2014 ×

BSG Students, Economic growth and resilience

Durbar Square in Kathmandu  (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Kathmandu is hit by a major earthquake every 70 or 80 years – and the last was in 1934

Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal and home to an estimated 2.5m people, sits in a zone of high seismic activity. The city has historically been hit by a major earthquake every 70 or 80 years. The last big one was in 1934. The eight-magnitude quake destroyed most of Kathmandu’s houses, […]

by × 08 December 2014 ×

BSG Students, Governance, cooperation and law

Everyone loses in the National Lottery

Everyone loses in the National Lottery

“Anyone can be a winner!” proclaim the billboards advertising the Israeli National Lottery, but in this game of chance, distributive justice is the clear loser. What at first seems like a voluntary, fun and harmless way to raise money for the public good is in fact a colossal tax-levying mechanism, under-regulated and regressive, not only in Israel but around the world.

by × 04 December 2014 ×