Post Tagged with: "Canada"

BSG Students, Health, welfare and well-being

Yes, I am a Rhodes Scholar who is “just” a family doctor. Here’s why.

Yes, I am a Rhodes Scholar who is “just” a family doctor. Here’s why.

“So you’re a Rhodes Scholar, and you’re just a family doctor?” If I was paid a dollar each time I’m asked this question, I can safely retire. It seems innocent enough, and it’s usually asked without malice. But the fundamental assumption behind this question alarms me: that family doctors are […]

by × 18 August 2015 ×

BSG Students, Deepening Democracy

Joanne in Oxford

More than a ‘name on the ballot’: why politics, why now?

Last week, I launched a campaign to contest the Canadian federal nomination for the New Democratic Party in my hometown riding of Sherwood Park-Fort Saskatchewan. Canada is preparing for a federal election in October, and after almost 10 years of Conservative rule our multi-party political system is primed for an […]

by × 10 June 2015 ×

BSG Students, Deepening Democracy

NDP leader Rachel Notley speaks on stage after being named Alberta's new Premier in Edmonton on May 5, 2015. (Photo: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette. Source: WikiMedia )

In defense of moderation

I’m a citizen of Alberta, supposedly the most right-leaning province in Canada. With an economy fueled mostly by energy royalties from our “oil-sands” in the north, the collapsed price of oil has not done our province any favors. In recent elections on 5 May 2015, voters decisively ended 44-straight years […]

by × 11 May 2015 ×

BSG Students, Economic growth and resilience

Multiculturalism Isn’t A Monolith

Multiculturalism Isn’t A Monolith

MPP student Zain Jinnah reflects on the differing experiences of immigrants in their host countries… I was born and raised in Calgary, a medium-sized city nestled at the foothills of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Some call Calgary a redneck city due to it having a “Wild West” type of culture, […]

by × 03 June 2013 ×

BSG Students, Deepening Democracy

Deepening Democracy, Deepening Divides: Can democracy and the international refugee regime coexist?

Deepening Democracy, Deepening Divides: Can democracy and the international refugee regime coexist?

A report on deepening democracy released by the Global Commission on Elections, Democracy and Security recognised that the enfranchisement of displaced populations, including refugees, ‘is critical for ensuring the integrity of elections and the establishment of democracy’. But this statement belies a deeper interaction, and even conflict, between the international refugee regime and democracy.

What would ‘deepening democracy’ mean for the refugee regime? I suggest that strengthening democratic institutions could deepen divides between refugees and host communities. To ensure that the international refugee regime and democracy can successfully co-exist, we must think not just of deepening democracy, but of also balancing it with the rights of refugees.

by × 27 November 2012 ×