Science and technology

BSG Alumni, Science and technology

US general election polls 2016. Source: Wikimedia

Systemic errors, group behaviour and uncertainty: Why the polls did not predict Trump’s victory

Many people predicted that Hillary Clinton would win the US presidential elections – academics, pollsters, newspapers. I was assuming so, too. She was leading with a significant edge in national polls over the last weeks of the electoral campaign. But now Donald Trump is the President-elect. Why did the polls […]

by × 01 December 2016 ×

BSG Alumni, Science and technology

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during the campaign in 2016. Source; Wikimedia.

Three ways in which technology is shaping the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign

The 2016 U.S. presidential election is the most technologically advanced election in history. Both candidates have different strategies and different styles, and they are leveraging different kinds of tools but one is similar: both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump recognise the substantial impact of technology on their race to the […]

by × 25 October 2016 ×

BSG Faculty, Science and technology

Image: Pixabay

Governance in the Digital Century

On 30 September, at the stroke of midnight, the U.S. government took a revolutionary step towards a new regime of global digital governance: the U.S. concluded that a global coalition of private businesses, governments, and civic groups is ready to oversee a core function of the Internet. Until now the […]

by × 11 October 2016 ×

BSG Students, Science and technology

Computer and e-waste recycling in Africa. Source: Free Computer Recycling.

The advent of South-South cooperation in dealing with global e-waste challenge?

South-South cooperation has become an integral part in achieving UN Sustainable Development Goals. Now we may find structural transformation from natural resource export based economies towards “Made-in-Africa” industrial economy on Africa’s new development agenda. Circular economy offers a set of pathways for African countries to fulfill their intended nationally determined […]

by × 17 August 2016 ×

BSG Students, Science and technology

Image from a panel discussion at the Blavatnik School of Government. Photo by John Cairns.

Why can’t the government be more like TripAdvisor?

To get a new driver’s license in Jakarta, one has to go to a police administrative office, whose front façade is usually adorned with large banners saying “our commitment is to give prime service” or “we’re not perfect but we always try.” But anyone who has been there knows that […]

by × 18 May 2016 ×

BSG Students, Science and technology

Demonstration
in Hamburg, Germany the day after the attacks in Paris. Photo by Rasande Tyskar on Flickr.

Humanitarian innovation: Lasting solutions to big challenges?

Unprecedented numbers of migrants made their way across the Mediterranean in 2015. While policymakers argue about how best to respond, a bottom up social movement has flourished. From the Refugees Welcome website, dubbed Airbnb for refugees, to coding schools for refugees, innovators are using technology to ease pressures on services. […]

by × 20 November 2015 ×

BSG Students, Science and technology

The MPP students in the Technology group. From left: Ameen Barghi, Mikolaj Firlej, Dorkina Carmell Myrick, Liliana Estrada-Galindo, Joao Francisco Maria, Miguel Enrique Renteria-Rodriguez

Why should politicians and policymakers care about science and technology?

History has shown that technological change is inevitable. Seventy-five years ago, it took hours to decode Enigma. Today, nearly 2 billion people use smartphones to instantly access an endless repository of information. Other revolutionary technologies, such as artificial intelligence, drones, and gene editing, will re-shape the future in ways that […]

BSG Students, Science and technology

Australian wind farm, picture by David Clarke on Flickr

Sound and fury, signifying nothing

On January 21st, 2015 The Australian published an article on the front page of the paper reporting on a ‘groundbreaking study’. This study showed that ‘people living near wind farms face a greater risk of suffering health complaints caused by the low-frequency noise generated by turbines’. The wording of that […]

by × 03 March 2015 ×