Recent posts

BSG Alumni, Health, welfare and well-being

The coronavirus pandemic and governance challenges in the age of social media

The coronavirus pandemic and governance challenges in the age of social media

At the time of writing, COVID-19 is finding new epicentres, with the surrounding confusion and misinformation increasing day by day. There have been pandemics before, but one in the age of social media is a historic first that has thrown up problems that are more than medical. Whatsapp, Facebook and […]

by × 23 March 2020 ×

Admissions and Life at the School, BSG Staff

Admissions update: the final countdown

Admissions update: the final countdown

Whenever you ask a member of the Blavatnik School admissions team how they are at this time of year, you can guarantee the answer will be: “Busy!” Since the application deadline for the Master of Public Policy closed, they’ve been working to process well over 700 applications from 99 countries […]

by × 09 March 2020 ×

BSG Students, Governance, cooperation and law

Lebanon in free fall: it may get worse before it gets better

Lebanon in free fall: it may get worse before it gets better

In October 2019, demonstrators took to the streets of Lebanon, chanting “all of them means all of them”— a cry for the entire government to resign. For the first time in years, the country witnessed the mobilisation of thousands of its citizens across every city. There were even Lebanese protests […]

by × 06 March 2020 ×

BSG Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

Close-up of a traditional, worn sign showing the direction to the town hall.

Efficiency and legitimacy in inter-local agreements: why collaboration has become a default choice among councils

Historically, English local councils aspired to be self-sufficient. Despite engaging in thorough collaboration with agencies outside of the local government system, local authorities have exhibited a remarkable aversion to the kinds of inter-municipal collaboration commonly practised in Europe and the USA. But this changed markedly after 2010, with the Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition government […]

by × 02 March 2020 ×

BSG Students, Science and technology

‘A Look at the Issues’: the Blavatnik School students’ podcast on current public policy matters

‘A Look at the Issues’: the Blavatnik School students’ podcast on current public policy matters

When we started our Master of Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government and met all the students and staff, we could not help but feel overwhelmed by the diversity, the passion, the compassion and the vision that everyone had. What every single individual who studies and works here […]

by × 28 February 2020 ×

BSG Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

Wind turbines in the North Sea, England

What the world needs now is… a net zero club

With just over eight months to go, we now have a new COP26 president in place and preparations for the biggest international summit the UK has ever hosted are in full swing. Alok Sharma has no easy task. The eyes of the world will be on Glasgow this November for […]

by × 27 February 2020 ×

BSG Staff, Economic growth and resilience

Pathways for Prosperity Commissioners (including Shivani Siroya) at the final report launch in Nairobi Kenya, November 2019.  Photo: Paul Mbugua.

Four lessons on how to run a policy commission

I’ve just finished running a global commission based here at the Blavatnik School of Government: Pathways for Prosperity, co-chaired by – among others – Melinda Gates. It was set up to challenge the narrative that in developing countries, technology necessarily equals catastrophic job losses and widening inequalities, and to explore […]

by × 26 February 2020 ×

BSG Faculty, Health, welfare and well-being

People wearing masks in Guangzhou, China, February 2020. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

When viruses turn political

Before the coronavirus exploded into the news, a report by the World Health Organization warned that the world was not prepared for “a fast-moving, virulent respiratory pathogen pandemic” that could kill 50-80 million people, cause panic and instability, and seriously affect the global economy and trade. The experience of the last 200-plus […]

by × 17 February 2020 ×