Recent posts

Health, welfare and well-being, Students

Medical education in Germany: first improve your training

Medical education in Germany: first improve your training

A dreadful event On 22 August 2011, in a hospital in Germany, a final year medical student killed an infant with leukemia by giving a cotrimoxazol suspension into the veins that was supposed to be administered via the oral route – the child died of an anaphylactic shock. This horrific […]

by × 07 October 2013 ×

Economic growth and resilience, Faculty

Using Financial Incentives and Mobile Monitoring to Address Teacher Absenteeism in Uganda’s Primary Schools

Using Financial Incentives and Mobile Monitoring to Address Teacher Absenteeism in Uganda’s Primary Schools

Researchers from the Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) in Uganda, the Department of Economics and Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University, and Georgetown University School of Public Policy, in collaboration with World Vision Uganda, are examining how to increase teacher presence in rural primary schools in Uganda. Preliminary results […]

by × 23 September 2013 ×

Health, welfare and well-being, Students

School uniforms in Kenya – time to rethink?

School uniforms in Kenya – time to rethink?

Pele, a seventeen year old Kenyan girl, is the oldest of seven siblings. She used to have an older brother but he died very early. And so did her father, leaving his seven children alone with their mother, who is suffering from severe medical conditions. With Pele being the oldest, […]

by × 17 September 2013 ×

Economic growth and resilience, Guest contributor

Europe’s Asian Pivot

Europe’s Asian Pivot

CAMBRIDGE/OXFORD – The Obama administration’s so-called “pivot to Asia” is the most important strategic shift that the United States has undertaken since the end of the Cold War – and it has profound implications for Europe. But Europe’s leaders have largely ignored or misunderstood its significance, and thus have failed […]

by × 13 September 2013 ×

Economic growth and resilience, Guest contributor

The case for political reform in Europe

The case for political reform in Europe

The recent economic crisis has revealed, amongst other things, that certain political systems in southern Europe seriously struggle to deliver good governance. Political elites in Italy, Greece, Portugal and Spain have not only proven incapable of delivering prosperity to their people but have presided over (and in some cases profited […]

by × 12 September 2013 ×

Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

Global Cooperation Buckling Under Past Successes

Global Cooperation Buckling Under Past Successes

In finance and beyond, how is global cooperation failing from its own prior wins? The 2008-2009 financial crisis was arguably the greatest economic calamity since the Great Depression. Why, then, has regulatory reform in key countries and at the global level been so piecemeal? Measures that have been agreed on, […]

by × 11 September 2013 ×

Economic growth and resilience, Faculty

Global institutions after the crisis

Global institutions after the crisis

When Lehman Brothers collapsed and the global financial crisis erupted five years ago, many glimpsed a silver lining: the promise of more effective global economic governance. But, despite a flurry of early initiatives, the world remains as far from that goal as ever. The Financial Stability Board (FSB), established after the G-20 […]

by × 06 September 2013 ×

Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

Understanding China’s domestic agenda can end UN climate gridlock

Understanding China’s domestic agenda can end UN climate gridlock

The EU and US need to understand the domestic constraints to what they can contribute to Chinese climate policy Li Shuo of Greenpeace China has recently argued on chinadialogue that UN climate talks can drive more ambitious greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions in China, the world’s largest emitter. This optimism goes against […]

by × 03 July 2013 ×