Post Tagged with: "Hong Kong"

BSG Alumni, Governance, cooperation and law

Central Square and Legislative Council Building, Hong Kong

In the darkest hour we must have faith not fear

We have hit a new low over these past two weeks. Barely anyone could have foreseen the outcome of the US elections last week that has led to a questioning of democracy. While in Hong Kong, Beijing NPCSC’s interpretation of the Basic Law (the constitution that governs Hong Kong Special […]

by × 18 November 2016 ×

BSG Alumni, Governance, cooperation and law

Image source Flickr: Jordi Bernabeu Farrús

Hong Kong: Above and Beyond in Students’ Idealism

Like the typhoon that lashed Hong Kong last month, the Occupying Central Movement and student-led strike are in full swing.

Metaphorically, “One Country, Two Systems” is a “symbiosis” – like that of a crown fish and an anemone. While the symbiotic union between the two is usually mutualistic, it can turn antagonistic if inherent contradictions are ill-managed.

by × 13 October 2014 ×

BSG Alumni, Governance, cooperation and law

Image source: Flickr Pasu Au Yeung

Do you hear the people sing? A fight to define who we are

In the 2012 film adaptation of Les Miserables, there was this scene towards the end where the students realised none of the local Paris citizens have joined them in their protests and they were effectively deserted to fight on their own. For all the songs that were sung, speeches that were given, none of the citizens were stirred enough or believed in the cause enough to “join in their crusade”.
As the protests in Hong Kong continue, there is a worry that we face a similar parallel to Les Miserables if the current protests do not get enough popular support from the local public.

by × 03 October 2014 ×

BSG Students, Deepening Democracy

Fighting corruption: Effective examples from surprising places

Fighting corruption: Effective examples from surprising places

What could Hong Kong, Liberia, and Kosovo teach us? Perhaps, rather unexpectedly, about successful ways of dealing with public corruption. Corruption is effectively a hidden tax on living and doing business in many emerging democracies and, as a result, is one of the most serious obstacles to deepening democracy and economic development. It is particularly dangerous when corruption turns into a culturally accepted practice.

by × 26 November 2012 ×