Post Tagged with: "refugees"

Alumni, Economic growth and resilience

A year after the Beirut blast: Is Lebanon falling into the abyss?

A year after the Beirut blast: Is Lebanon falling into the abyss?

Beirut, 4 August 2020. Amid the rubble caused by one of the most powerful non-nuclear explosions in history, lay a clock with hands frozen at 6:09 PM. The clock not only marked the exact moment of this tragedy, it also became the metaphor for the political paralysis over the years that plunged Lebanon into darkness.

by × 04 August 2021 ×

Alumni, Governance, cooperation and law

Angela Merkel at World Economic Forum 2011. Source: Wikimedia.

The end of the Merkel era in Germany – what remains?

After the local election of the state of Hesse last October, Angela Merkel announced that she would step down as head of the conservative party (Christian Democratic Union, CDU), but remain Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany until 2021, thereby retiring step by step. With the recent election of […]

by × 11 December 2018 ×

Science and technology, Students

Demonstration
in Hamburg, Germany the day after the attacks in Paris. Photo by Rasande Tyskar on Flickr.

Humanitarian innovation: Lasting solutions to big challenges?

Unprecedented numbers of migrants made their way across the Mediterranean in 2015. While policymakers argue about how best to respond, a bottom up social movement has flourished. From the Refugees Welcome website, dubbed Airbnb for refugees, to coding schools for refugees, innovators are using technology to ease pressures on services. […]

by × 20 November 2015 ×

Deepening Democracy, Students

Deepening Democracy, Deepening Divides: Can democracy and the international refugee regime coexist?

Deepening Democracy, Deepening Divides: Can democracy and the international refugee regime coexist?

A report on deepening democracy released by the Global Commission on Elections, Democracy and Security recognised that the enfranchisement of displaced populations, including refugees, ‘is critical for ensuring the integrity of elections and the establishment of democracy’. But this statement belies a deeper interaction, and even conflict, between the international refugee regime and democracy.

What would ‘deepening democracy’ mean for the refugee regime? I suggest that strengthening democratic institutions could deepen divides between refugees and host communities. To ensure that the international refugee regime and democracy can successfully co-exist, we must think not just of deepening democracy, but of also balancing it with the rights of refugees.

by × 27 November 2012 ×