Post Tagged with: "UK"

BSG Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

Image: Flickr CC

The Brexit impossibility triangle

With the European Union’s latest extension of the United Kingdom’s membership in the bloc, onlookers around the world are right to wonder why the Brexit process has proved so intractable. The short answer is that the UK’s government and parliament are trying to achieve three incompatible goals: preserving the country’s […]

by × 15 April 2019 ×

BSG Faculty, Economic growth and resilience

Brexit’s lost world

Brexit’s lost world

Three shifts, in particular, have created a more hostile environment for a plucky country wanting to set out on its own. First, the global rules-based system has been seriously weakened. Second, China no longer looks like such a good partner for the United Kingdom. And, third, tech platforms have left […]

by × 21 February 2019 ×

BSG Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

A People's Vote march in London on 23 June 2018. Photo by ilovetheeu via Wikimedia Commons.

The referendum risk

Now that British Prime Minister Theresa May, facing certain defeat, has postponed Parliament’s vote on the deal she concluded with the European Union last month on the United Kingdom’s departure from the bloc, the case for a “people’s vote” – a second Brexit referendum – is gaining ground. But is […]

by × 13 December 2018 ×

BSG Faculty, Economic growth and resilience

Photo credit: Jens Mahnke on Pexels

Britain’s losing trade strategy

Given the escalating trade war between the United States and China, countries around the world are rushing to consolidate their trade relations and preserve existing supply chains. Not so the UK, which is now in the final stages of negotiations to withdraw from the European Union – a move that […]

by × 29 August 2018 ×

BSG Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

Participants of the 44th G7 summit in La Malbaie, 8 June 2018. Image credit: 内閣官房内閣広報室 via Wikimedia Commons

Does international cooperation require shared values?

Between escalating trade disputes and the divisions at the G7’s summit this month, the breakdown of global governance has become starkly apparent. The United States can no longer be counted on to uphold, much less enforce, existing rules, and countries more broadly cannot be assumed to agree on, much less […]

by × 27 June 2018 ×

BSG Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

UKIP Campaigners on the eve of the Eastleigh by-elections 2013. Image credit: Jennifer Jane Mills

How to steal the populists’ clothes

“Don’t get mad, get even.” That aphorism needs to become the new norm in democratic politics across Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Rather than complaining about populist successes, established political parties should take a page from the populist playbook. Three lessons, in particular, cry out for attention. The first […]

by × 11 April 2018 ×

BSG Alumni, Health, welfare and well-being

How 300,000 “forgotten people” are falling through cracks in the welfare system

How 300,000 “forgotten people” are falling through cracks in the welfare system

When we think of needy people, we usually think of the unemployed. Government systems—and our entire way of thinking—is focussed around joblessness as a marker for needing support. My recent Resolution Foundation research suggests the relationship between unemployment and needing help isn’t so clear cut. Most unemployed people don’t get benefits; while […]

by × 15 January 2018 ×

BSG Faculty, Governance, cooperation and law

Protest outside County Hall Norwich against cuts to social care. Image credit: Roger Blackwell

When welfare sabotages lives

As Christmas approaches, the United Kingdom is accelerating the rollout of a social security scheme only Ebenezer Scrooge could love. The “universal credit” programme replaces six different welfare benefits – such as the child tax credit and the housing benefit – with one. The goal is to incentivise employment, and […]

by × 26 December 2017 ×